Abandoned Gold and Copper Mines in California's El Paso Mountains

Abandoned Gold and Copper Mines in California's El Paso Mountains

The history of mining in California’s El Paso Mountains begins in 1893, when placer gold was discovered in Goler Canyon. Dozens of prospectors began searching the nearby dry gulches for placer gold, while others combed the hillsides looking for veins carrying precious metals. Small deposits of gold, copper, and even tungsten were found across the mountain range. While the placer gold deposits proved the be very rich, the many hardrock mines were hardly profitable. Mining in the El Paso’s would revive in the 1920’s, but again, most hardrock mines proved to be failures.

Dozens of abandoned mining sites now dot the range, many of them well hidden in steep canyons. In this video, you’ll see the remains of several gold and copper mines of various sizes. The history about these individual mines are vague, but they showcase the amazing amount of effort put forth by the miners.

25 Comments

  1. Beeps & Eat's Finding food & treasure on November 21, 2021 at 10:12 am

    Thanks for going the extra mile on this explore! I was wondering myself where that ore pass was coming from.

  2. david flanagan on November 21, 2021 at 10:14 am

    All those old helium balloons, and stacked rock walls around were interesting, enjoy your vids look forward to the next one.

  3. Mike Bode on November 21, 2021 at 10:15 am

    The geology! I say NOPE to rocks like that in front of a portal. Good luck!

  4. ronnie cardy on November 21, 2021 at 10:17 am

    Nice colors in this mine

  5. Denys Poyner on November 21, 2021 at 10:19 am

    @ 5:00 that looks like Zinc oxide to me. @ 11:20 Kerosene cans. Cool explore, new sub !

  6. Terri Bearbower on November 21, 2021 at 10:22 am

    I love your camera. Great color

  7. Giulio M on November 21, 2021 at 10:22 am

    Maybe you should carry a BB gun pistol for mice, rats, and snakes.

  8. z50king29 on November 21, 2021 at 10:23 am

    Great video. I’ve never seen that first site

  9. San Clemente Railfan on November 21, 2021 at 10:26 am

    why are you saying the BLM put fuences there that do that shit out in te middle of nowhere

  10. mike nelson on November 21, 2021 at 10:27 am

    I did not know mustard came in a can. Thanks for the explore.

  11. wbbh on November 21, 2021 at 10:28 am

    From the shape of the can and the word mustard, it was probably sardines in mustard sauce.

  12. Huck Outdoors on November 21, 2021 at 10:32 am

    So much good stuff in the el pasos

  13. Edward Barba on November 21, 2021 at 10:32 am

    Is it illegal to cut open the gates of a abandoned mine ?

  14. Sara Rook on November 21, 2021 at 10:37 am

    Your videos are super cool! I’m learning so much about mines. I wish occasionally you would define some of the terms you use while you investigate? Thanks 😊!

  15. jontrout007 on November 21, 2021 at 10:49 am

    Another great video, it’s nice not to see water through the mine. I would like to get out there in the desert to explore some of those mines.

  16. Justin Emery on November 21, 2021 at 10:51 am

    Cool vid. Never been in first one but have been in plenty in the area. Love that area for relaxing and exploring. From RedRock all way to Inyokern then east to Garlock/Rand. It looks like you have explored much further then myself out there but i’m usually out there to wheel/rockcrawl anyways

  17. lifedeath08 on November 21, 2021 at 10:53 am

    Anyone else see that rock face at 8:32

  18. HollywoodGraham on November 21, 2021 at 10:58 am

    Cool, keep exploring..

  19. Dave Cooper on November 21, 2021 at 11:01 am

    I enjoy looking at your videos. We do have the sort of mines you visit in the United Kingdom. Some dating to prehistoric times. One difference is that most of the U.K. is just plane damp or even wet. Timbers tend to rot out allowing the mines to become dangerous relatively quickly. I remember about 60 years ago. While still a teenager some of my mates & I thinking we may try mine exploration. A spate of fatal mine incidents put us off. We turned to motorcycles instead.
    Some old mines are open to the public. But apart from some controlled by caving groups nothing to really explore.

  20. Jäger The Fox on November 21, 2021 at 11:04 am

    I’m your 2,000th subscriber : )

  21. Gene Kelly on November 21, 2021 at 11:07 am

    I wonder with the recent sharp rise in the price of copper-if some of these old mines would get a second look.

  22. Richard Gill on November 21, 2021 at 11:10 am

    A little different than the air raid shelters in Europe.😎

  23. Sue Girling on November 21, 2021 at 11:10 am

    Hi, some cool mines but I think the rats got there before you lol. The rats seemed to have two classes, the rich rats got the bigger mines and the oh so shiny mylar balloons and the other rats just got the trash mainly. Thanks for sharing this cool location. xx

  24. Steven School Alchemy on November 21, 2021 at 11:10 am

    Greetings!

  25. Cheycasters on November 21, 2021 at 11:11 am

    Cool. I grew up in Ridgecrest/China Lake for 30 years and loved to ride Goler Wash after the killer Desert Rains… 33 years in NW Montana and I miss that Desert! Those stupid ballons are found in Death Valley all the time and inside of mines there as well!

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